Swim for Fruit

young indigenous girl with blow up ball

The Go for 2 and 5 Regional and Remote Aboriginal Communities Swimming Program (or Swim for Fruit) provides support for an after school and weekend lap swimming program and the expansion of the school based Swim & Survive programs in regional and remote Aboriginal communities.

Aboriginal Australians have higher disease and death rates, and also are 3.6 times more likely to drown than non-Aboriginal Australians, and Swim for Fruit aims to address this by providing swimming and water safety education and encouraging healthy eating. Children who complete a set number of laps in a session are rewarded with an afternoon tea of fresh fruits and healthy treats.

The program has enabled Royal Life Saving Society to expand pool based programs that encourage physical activity and promote healthy lifestyle habits to the communities. The expansion of the school Swim & Survive program aims to create direct links to increase participation in aquatic based sports such as water polo, competitive swimming, aqua aerobics and pool lifesaving.

The State Government through the Department of the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries and Healthway are major supporters of the Swim for Fruit program in Western Australia. Sport and recreation builds stronger, healthier, happier and safer communities.

 

An aboriginal girl and boy smiling at the camera while holding watermelon slices

Swim for Fruit Evaluation

An evaluation of our Swim for Fruit program, examining the barriers and enablers to participation, and its effectiveness in improving participants' physical activity, swimming and healthy eating.

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Image of Bernie Egan and Rita standing by the pool at Bidyadanga

Bernie's Story

Bidyadanga Remote Pool Manager Bernie Egan is keen to ensure remote aboriginal families learn Swim and Survive skills